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Corman Artisan

Baker-Pastry chef

Croissant

3.15 kg dough after preparation

Preparation of the dough

1770 g strong flour*
36 g salt
850 g water/milk
100 g sugar
40 g invert sugar
90 g yeast**
90 g milk powder if water is used
140 g Roasted Butter 98 % fat
26 g Improver
1000 g Express Butter 82 % Fat - Sheet
You can replace the 140 g Corman roasted butter with 140 g Corman dairy butter for a more neutral taste.

Did you know ?

You can replace the 140 g Corman roasted butter with 140 g Corman dairy butter for a more neutral taste.


Rolling out and resting of the dough

Tempering and rolling out the butter

Turning (2x4)

Cutting the croissant dough

Proof

Why is the correct rising temperature so important?

  • If the temperature is too high, the butter risks to melt, sticking the layers of dough together and preventing the croissants from being airy.
  • If the temperature is too low, the butter risks to break and the croissants having an irregular structure.

Humidity should not be too high in order to avoid the croissants of being too moist and the formation of bubbles during baking.
Corman Tip: If this is the case, let the croissants dry before baking them.

Did you know ?

Why is the correct rising temperature so important?

  • If the temperature is too high, the butter risks to melt, sticking the layers of dough together and preventing the croissants from being airy.
  • If the temperature is too low, the butter risks to break and the croissants having an irregular structure.

Humidity should not be too high in order to avoid the croissants of being too moist and the formation of bubbles during baking.
Corman Tip: If this is the case, let the croissants dry before baking them.


Baking

Corman'products of the recipe